1

Same Bow 

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

    The graph on the left "1" is commonly used to represent the draw force of a particular bow. It can be used to find the stack point of a bow and see the general draw force characteristic. 

 

   The term stack implies the draw force climbs suddenly at a specific draw length. This feels harsh to the Archer.  2 pounds per inch is considered good. 

   The vertical axis represents draw weight. the Horizontal axis represents the inches drawn

    The traditional draw force can be tricky. Scale length can have a natural smoothing effect on the graphic.  Having said that, a well proportioned Draw Force Curve often does not represent what the Archer feels. 

    To provide a better graphic that represents what the Archer feels when He or She draws  I started using the graph on the left "2". It simply represents the change in weight the Archer feels from inch to inch. Remember my measurement process has 3/10th of a pound of measurement error. 

     The vertical axis on this graph represents weight changed from inch to inch vs the incremental total weight of the traditional draw force curve.  The horizontal axis represents draw length. 

    I believe the last 5" of draw length are the most sensitive. Large changes in weight in this "sensitive zone" feel uncomfortable.  I am assuming this is true because we are transferring the weight while pulling through this section of the draw.  

    This Weight Change Graph "3" is constructed just like graph "2" it just represents one of the best feeling draw cycles that I have tested. Notice the gradual and smooth change per inch from 26" to 29".  This was taken on a 19" riser. The draw cycle improves on a longer riser. 

 

   Graph 4 on the left is a Draw force Curve shown with the bolts maxed, in the middle and 6 turns out.  It also shows the same limbs on 3 different risers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 5 Is similar to #4 above except its a Change in weight.  This may help you choose a riser length and where to run the bolts.  You have to consider my process has 3/10 or a pound of  Measurement Error.

 

You should look at the lines slope or trends. Exact points have measurement error that is very visible.  Some would suggest to smooth this out. I believe you lose signals when doing this. 

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